Student Wellness

The Office of Undergraduate Medical Education’s (UME) Student Affairs team is committed to medical student well being during training and beyond. UME Wellness offers programming that fosters a positive learning environment inside and outside the academic setting. Our goal is to encourage self-care, resilience, and multi-faceted health by providing tools to address all dimensions of wellness.

Developed by Dr. Bill Hettler, co-founder of the National Wellness Institute (NWI), this interdependent model commonly referred to as the Six Dimensions of Wellness, is the framework followed by this office. We have also added financial and environmental wellness.

Student wellness is a shared responsibility! Suggestions on wellness initiatives / activities can be sent to wellness@uthscsa.edu. We would love to hear from you! You may also contact the Director of Wellness & Professional Formation, Paulina H. Mazurek, MA.

Click HERE to find the UT Health SA wellness resource that is right for you!

Person stepping up stairs promoting active lifestyle

Physical Wellness

Physical wellness promotes proper care of our bodies for optimal health and functioning. This dimension of wellness encourages good sleep, good nutrition, physical activity, good hygiene and mental well-being to keep your body in great condition.

Woman with SmileEmotional Wellness

Emotional wellness promotes self-care, mindfulness & relaxation, and the development of inner strength. It is important to recognize and understand both positive and negative feelings in order to handle them in a constructive way.

Doctors shown conversing to highlight importance of occupational wellness

Occupational Wellness

Occupational wellness is the ability to recognize signs of stress, burnout, overwork, and fatigue as a result of your profession or place of work. It focuses on the ongoing search for our life’s purpose and finding a good professional fit.

a silhouette of a person is shown with clasped hands to show importance of spiritual wellbeing

Spiritual Wellness

Spirituality is a dimension that allows us to find meaning in our life experiences and defines our individual purpose in the world. Spiritual wellness can be expressed through religious faith, values, ethics and morals.

Friends gathered together conversing and having a meal, to highlight importance of social wellbeing

Social Wellness

Social wellness refers to the interactions and relationships we build with others. Positive connections foster healthy, nurturing, and supportive relationships. Having a supportive social network allows you to develop assertive skills, increases your self-esteem, develops trust, and manage conflict.

2 colleagues discussing ideas promoting importance of intellectual discourse and intellectual health

Intellectual Wellness

Intellectual wellness is being open to new ideas, thinking critically, and seeking out a new challenge. It is being creative, curious, and engaged in lifelong learning.

photo of physcian holding a piggy bank
Financial Wellness

Financial Wellness involves the process of learning how to successfully manage financial expenses. Money plays a critical role in our lives and not having enough of it impacts health as well as academic performance. Financial stress is repeatedly found to be a common source of stress, anxiety and fear for students.

Woman laying on grass
Environmental Wellness

Environmental wellness inspires us to live a lifestyle that is respectful of our surroundings. This realm encourages us to live in harmony with the Earth by taking action to protect it.

  • Stop by during Office Hours

    Monday – Friday, 8:00am to 5:00pm
    Office of Undergraduate Medical Education
    Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, Fifth Floor

  • Attend a Drop-in Advising Hour

    Every Wednesday, 1:00-2:00pm
    Dolph Briscoe, Jr. Library, Fifth Floor
    Howe Conference Room, 5.070